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Getting you back
on your feet

Peripheral Vascular Disease

What is Peripheral Vascular Disease (PDV)?

Does you leg hurt or become cramped while you walk or climb stairs? When you stop to rest, the pain may go away, but it comes back when you start to move again.
This pain cycle is called Intermittent Claudication. It can be a sign of peripheral vascular disease, or PVD (also known as “Poor circulation”). With PVD, the vessels that carry blood to your lower body become narrowed or blocked. This makes it harder for blood to reach your leg. If PVD is not treated, leg and foot tissue may die. This is called gangrene and may lead to amputation. You can help avoid such problems by working with your doctor.

Footnote

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) can raise your risk of frostbite. Keep your feet warm and dry in winter.

WHAT CAUSES PVD?

As you age, your blood vessels may become damaged. Plaque (a buildup of fat and other materials) may collect along the inner walls of the blood vessels. The plaque can narrow or block your blood vessels.

A HEALTHY VESSEL

A HEALTHY VESSEL

A healthy vessel allows blood to flow freely. Blood carries oxygen to the muscles. During activity, more oxygen is needed so more blood flows through the vessel. Leg tissue stays healthy if it receives enough blood.

A NARROWED VESSEL

A NARROWED VESSEL.

Plaque buildup reduces blood flow. Muscle tissue does not get enough oxygen- rich blood. Leg muscles may cramp during activity. Cramping may go away with rest, then return when activity resumes.

A BLOCKED VESSEL

A BLOCKED VESSEL.

Severe plaque buildup does not allow blood to flow. Leg muscles become oxygen-starved . Tissue begins to die. Muscles may cramp, even at rest. Night pains are common during this stage.

NOTE: Blockage can occur in more than one vessel in your leg.

CONTROLLING PVD

Certain health problems, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes, make PVD worse. Talk to your doctor abut controlling these problems. Below are some ways to manage PVD.

STOP SMOKING

Smoking narrows your blood vessels. It also raises your blood pressure. Ask your doctor about stop – smoking programs and aids.

CONTROL BLOOD SUGAR:

High blood sugar caused by diabetes can speed up damage to your blood vassels. Work with your doctor to control your blood sugar levels.

BE MORE ACTIVE:

Exercise improves blood flow. It can even help new blood vessels form. Exercise may hurt at first. But with regular activity, pain will begin to ease. Talk to your doctor about an exercise plan that’s right for you.

EAT RIGHT

Too much fat in your diet can raise cholesterol and clog blood vassels. Avoid fatty greasy and fried foods. Eat more fresh fruits and vegetables instead. And limit caffeine. It can narrow blood vessels.

OTHER TRATMENT OPTIONS:

For some people with PVD, medications or surgery may be suggested. Your doctor may talk to you about these treatment options.

Dr. Ahmadi offers the most advanced state of the art techniques for pain-free surgical and non-surgical treatment of any foot and ankle pathology. His goal for each patient is painless and pleasing results with early return to activity.

Dr. Ahmadi offers services in a wide variety of foot and ankle deformities and pathology such as:

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